Just found this on YouTube: the first almost 10 minutes of I Miss You I Miss You (逢いたくて逢いたくて), also known as I Wanted To Meet And I Wanted To See You.

There’s a decent amount of 19 year old Meiko Kaji 梶芽衣子 (still using her given name Masako Ota 太田雅子) in it.

The user who uploaded it has uploaded the first 10 minutes or so of a number of older Japanese films. It’s worth checking out if you’ve got some time.

You’ll also want to check out the first 10 minutes of Goodbye Tears (涙くんさようなら). Meiko doesn’t show up until about 9:30 minutes into it, so she’s not in it much, but she is kinda dancing adorably. :)

Press image for Monument To The Girls’ Corps (あゝひめゆりの塔).

Press image for Monument To The Girls’ Corps (あゝひめゆりの塔).

Poster for I Love The Sun (太陽が大好き) from 1966 and a close-up of Meiko Kaji (梶芽衣子), then going by her birth name Masako Ota (太田雅子), in it.

Press photo for Warm Misty Night (夜霧よ今夜も有難う), 1967

Press photo for Warm Misty Night (夜霧よ今夜も有難う), 1967

Screencap from Adventure With Him (あいつとの冒険).

Screencap from Adventure With Him (あいつとの冒険).

Press photo for That 19 Year Old’s Diary! (BG・ある19才の日記 あげてよかった!), 1968

Press photo for That 19 Year Old’s Diary! (BG・ある19才の日記 あげてよかった!), 1968

Screencap from Adventure With Him (あいつとの冒険), 1965.

Screencap from Adventure With Him (あいつとの冒険), 1965.

Screencap from A Go-Go Youth (青春ア・ゴーゴー), 1966.

Screencap from A Go-Go Youth (青春ア・ゴーゴー), 1966.

fuckyeahmeikokaji:

Poster announcing that Masako Ota (太田雅子) was changing her name to Meiko Kaji (梶芽衣子).

fuckyeahmeikokaji:

Poster announcing that Masako Ota (太田雅子) was changing her name to Meiko Kaji (梶芽衣子).

Poster for Monument To The Girls’ Corps (あゝひめゆりの塔) and a close up of Meiko Kaji (梶芽衣子) in it. If you want more info about this movie, I recommend the Midnight Eye review. I’ll copy and paste the relevant bit from it here:

Among the ensemble of schoolgirls in indentical white head scarves only the hawkeyed will likely spot Meiko Kaji, still credited under her birth name Masako Ota. However, as the story progresses, the focus gradually narrows over the course of the running time, down to a quintet of intrepid girls that include Kaji. The weight of the drama, however, is fully on the shoulders of Yoshinaga, who was in every way Kaji’s polar opposite, a fresh-faced starlet who would go on to be one of the most in-demand actresses of the next two decades (and is currently making a rather puzzlingly sudden comeback through films such as Isao Yukisada’s Year One in the North / Kita no Zero-nen). Masuda also realised the difference between the two, even at this early stage in their careers, and it is fascinating to see how much of their temperament (or rather, the direction in which studio management wished to push them) shines through in the film: When the two girls carry a wounded soldier to his bunk, they implore a former teacher of theirs to move out of the way and let them pass. But the bespectacled man just sits there, muttering that all is lost for Japan. No prizes for guessing which of the two girls steps forward to strike an angry blow across the coward’s face.